The Colossus

 Historically (perhaps (?) since the days of Prof. Max Muller and Dr. George Thibet), the Sanskrit word ‘brahman‘ is rendered into English as Consciousness which is ‘caitanya.’ ‘brahman‘ is derived from the root “bRh” which means very huge. The derivation can take many forms like:

bRihatvAt – unimaginably Infinite in expansiveness;

brahmaNatvAt – encloses everything within Itself (all-inclusive);

barhaNatvAt – deliquesces [assimilates (absorbs/dissolves) all into Itself.]

Possibly “Colossus” may have been better or a more appropriate translation for brahman, IMHO, because Consciousness captures only one aspect of brahman, the other two being Beingness and Bliss (going by the popular “sat-cit-Ananda“).

Vedanta offers us three unique prakriyA-s (processes) to ‘understand each of the three aspects of brahman, as follows:

The Substance and form (kAraNa-kArya) Analysis to decipher Beingness aspect;

The Seer and the seen (dRik-dRishya) Analysis to decipher Consciousness aspect; and

The Experiencer and the experienced (bhokta- bhojya) Analysis to decipher Bliss aspect.

This is the 3-pill ‘prescription’ by the Advaitic Medicos (Vaid – the Knowers) to cut asunder the disease of ‘ignorance’ rooted in us.

We have an example for how the Seer-seen analysis goes in this short Video of Rupert Spira. Similar analysis to know the ‘core’ substance of all forms and the deeply ingrained Bliss will lead us to realize brahman.

 

 
 
 
 
 
 

1 thought on “The Colossus

  1. ‘But if there is a state where the soul can find a resting-place secure enough to establish itself and concentrate its entire being there, with no need to remember the past or reach into the future, where time is nothing to it, where the present runs on indefinitely but this duration goes unnoticed, with no sign of the passing of time, and no other feeling of deprivation or enjoyment, pleasure or pain, desire or fear than the simple feeling of existence, a feeling that fills our soul entirely, as long as this state lasts, we can call ourselves happy, not with a poor, incomplete and relative happiness such as we find in the pleasures of life, but with a sufficient, complete and perfect happiness which leaves no emptiness to be filled in the soul. Such is the state which I often experienced in my solitary reveries on the Island of Saint-Pierre…’
    – Rousseau

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